plants

Are your house plants making you healthy?

Ok, so we’re HUGE fans of a house plant (comes with the job), but did you know that as well as looking amazing, your house plants could actually be providing you with a whole host of health benefits too? There’s actually been studies and research conducted on this theory and this not only applies at home, but in work spaces, schools and care homes also.

 

Some key facts and figures to mention:

Ø  Indoor plants can reduce staff sick leave (possibly over 60%)

Ø  37% reduction in tension and anxiety when houseplants were introduced into the workplace, as well as promoting wellbeing and performance. 

Ø  Increased productivity when placed on your desk

Ø  Decreased perceptions of pain and discomfort

Ø  Dementia sufferers have also been noted to have better stimulated senses and more positive emotions when indoor plants are present.

 

You can’t argue with science right? So which plants would be best? Let’s see, here’s a few of our favourites:

If you’re wanting to absorb any negative energy, then how about the Climbing Fig? We love this one as the plant can look truly fantastic whether it’s growing from a hanging basket or climbing the wall itself (it’s all in the name). The white edges of the leaves are believed (in China anyway) to be the good green spirit, erasing any negative energy hanging around in the room.  

The Monstera is big, bold and eye catching especially as it’s such a stunning injection of green to your space. This plant will balance energies and boost your mood right up.

IF you’re feeling lucky then that could be down to Devil’s Ivy- don’t let the name fool you as this plant is said to provide good luck and fortune to its owners as well as inspiring creativity thanks to its beautifully patterned leaves

If it’s a sense of calm you’re looking for, then we definitely recommend the Asparagus Fern. Super easy to care for, it’s light, bright and airy bringing calm vibes to your surroundings.

 

Did you know we stock all of the above in our shop? If we don’t have them in stock then we’re able to source them for you with just a few days’ notice. Don’t forget to tag us @flowers_with_passion in your feel good floral pics- we’d love to see them!

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Plant care - Amaryllis

Amaryllis: December Houseplant of the Month

The story of Amaryllis

Stylish and sensual Amaryllis (also known as Hippeastrum) is available in many varieties and rich earthy colours. This houseplant’s big feature is its changing appearance. A stately hollow stem emerges from a bulb on which smooth buds develop. Those open into voluminous calyxes with velvety petals in white, salmon, red, pink or even green. The flowers can reach a diameter of 20 cm. This is very spectacular, particularly because you do not expect such a lavish display from such a sleek stem, especially not in the winter months. 

Origin

Amaryllis is a member of the Narcissus family, with more than 70 species. It’s native to the (sub-)tropical regions of Mexico and the Caribbean through to northern Argentina. The first plants probably developed in Brazil. The plant was first cultivated in Europe in around 1800. 

What to look for when buying Amaryllis

  • When buying Amaryllis, look at the colour and the flower shape which will emerge from the bulbs. The larger the bulb, the more (hollow) stems emerge from it, sometimes up to 3-4 stems per pot. Every stem produces 3 or 4 conical flowers.
  • Check that the bulb is well rooted and not too loose in the pot. A green tip must already visible on the bulb when purchasing. 
  • Check that there is no mould on the bulb or the soil - a sign that the plant has been too damp. 
  • The bulb and stems can be affected by ‘red blotch’ (red stripes on the stem) but this does not detract from the lifespan. 

Choice of range

The Amaryllis range is very broad. Alongside main colours such as red, pink and white, new colours are constantly being added, like salmon, lilac, green, orange and bicoloured varieties with stripes or edges. There are varieties with single and double flowers. Bulbs with a wax or felt coating that the consumer doesn’t have to do anything to are very popular. Do stress that it requires patience: it takes a few weeks for a bulb to start growing.

An Amaryllis in a pot develops slightly faster. 

Care tips

  • Amaryllis can tolerate both dark and light positions, as long as it’s reasonably cool.
  • Do not allow the soil to dry out, but do not have standing water either. Bulbs with felt or wax will flower without water, but should not be too warm, otherwise the flowers will dry up.
  • There’s no need to feed, since the nutrients are already in the bulb. 

Thanks to The Flower Council of Holland - http://thejoyofplants.co.uk/

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Plant care - poinsettias

Poinsettias

Here at Flowers With Passion in Longridge we have several different varieties to choose from - red, cream, pink, speckled. All beautifully gift wrapped either in mixed planted containers or individually wrapped for your own home or as a gift for a loved one.

We Care - pass the message on!

With the plants being the undisputed stars of the festive season we would like to highlight the reasons why your local florist should be the go to shop to buy your poinsettias.

Care guide - Temperature

Poinsettias need warmth and light and must be kept away from draughts. That means they must be kept away from fireplaces, doorways, open windows, and breezy hallways.  Poinsettias originate from Mexico, hence their sensitivity to the cold and wind.  Keep your plant somewhere that has some natural daylight.  They're most happy in temperature between 15 and 20°C, so it will be completely at home in most living rooms.

Essential buying tips…

We should share the message that If the retailer hasn’t handled your poinsettia correctly, it may well not last at home.  You should never buy a poinsettia that’s been sitting next to a set of automatic doors that open every 30 seconds, because it will have been damaged by chilly winter draughts, they don't appreciate the cold blast of air, then a hot blast from air heaters!

When you choose a plant, it shouldn't be too light or heavy - it should be neither soaking wet nor totally dry.  Other information worth sharing is how you can spot how healthy a plant is feeling by just looking carefully at it; dense foliage and yellow-green budding flowers in between the coloured bracts are sure signs of quality. 

Care guide - Watering

Poinsettias don’t like a lot of water. The plant’s root ball should neither dry out nor be drenched. Overwatering can quickly lead to waterlogging, which in turn causes the roots to rot and leaves you with a dead plant.

The easiest way to care for them is to either immerse the whole pot and root ball in water once a week in tepid water and let it drain before popping it back in the pot.  Similar to how you would a Phalaenopsis orchid.  The alternative is to give it a small amount of water every few days. 

Safe Journey Home…

Finally, make sure poinsettias are all wrapped up to protect it from the cold on the journey home.  Ask your florist to gift wrap your poinsettia for you.

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